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Manage lost productivity and absenteeism during Super Bowl and Olympics

  1. Turn unplanned absences into planned ones
    In addition to employees calling in sick after a late night cheering on the Seahawks or the Broncos, an estimated 4.4 million employees arrive late to work the Monday after the Super Bowl, finds Kronos. However, managers who know ahead of time that employees will sleep in can curb productivity losses. Kronos found a 19% loss in productivity for unplanned absence as opposed to 13% for planned absence. “How can we make more of those unplanned absences planned? Employers can create policies and a company culture that will encourage and support employees for requesting time off beforehand, which gives the managers the ability to plan for that absence ahead of time and mitigate some of that productivity loss,” explains Joyce Maroney, director of the Workforce Institute at Kronos. 
  2. Offering flexibility
    Organizations with a high number of Gen X and Gen Y employees are typically short staffed the Monday after the big game. So companies, especially those with younger employees should offer flexible work house when feasible. “Being an employer of choice often comes down to not necessarily the employer that pays the most, but the employer that gives employees autonomy, treats employees like human beings who have lives outside the office and is willing to make accommodations in the form of paid time off, flexible work hours, and work from home where that’s supportable,” Says Maroney.
  3. Look for patterns
    By analyzing absenteeism data, employers can fine and offset patterns where workers typically call in sick. For example, they can market flu benefits to convince employees to get flu shots before suffering from widespread absences. Around the world, Chinese workers are most likely (58%) to call in sick to they can stay home and watch or attend a sporting event, while in France only 1% were likely to do so.
  4. Get in on the fun
    Which sports were most likely to cause employes to miss work? In Australia, France, Mexico and the U.K, soccer took the top spot. In the U.S., it was football. Employers can positively channel excitement by having their on-site cafeteria serve game-day food like subs or wings. Or they can tap into the excitement of the event by hosting employee appreciation days throughout the year.Sports provide a connection for colleagues to discuss the game, let off steam and get together in a friendly way.
  5. Plan accordingly
    Maroney suggests that managers don’t plan to kick off any big, bold initiatives for Monday morning after the Super Bowl. Instead, managers should proactively bring up the possibility of absences the week before and ask that anyone planning a lat night let them know now whether they’ll be coming in later or not at all on Monday.

Sources:

Employee Benefit News, 2014

  1. “How can we make more of those unplanned absences planned? Employers can create policies and a company culture that will encourage and support employees for requesting time off beforehand, which gives the managers the ability to plan for that absence ahead of time and mitigate some of that productivity loss,” explains Joyce Maroney, director of the Workforce Institute at Kronos.

EAP: FOR A HEALTHIER WORKFORCE

Today’s employers have the responsibility to make the workplace safe, prevent risks to employee health, and ensure that the work environment is secure and protected. Most companies acknowledge that employee health and safety is paramount to any successful business. What is often overlooked is that many employees suffer from underlying issues that directly prevent them from being as productive as they could be. In these stressful times, the frequency and magnitude of human problems has, predictably, increased. To this end, many companies provide an Employee Assistance Program.

Just what is an EAP?

An Employee Assistance Program is a program designed to assist in the identification and resolution of productivity problems including, but not limited to, health, marriage, family, financial, alcohol and drugs, legal, emotional stress, or other personal issues which may adversely affect employee job performance (EAPA, 1990).

Most EAPs began in the 1940s with employer concerns about alcoholism among white-collar workers. Gradually these programs evolved and began treating mental, emotional, and financial problems, as well as those problems caused by alcohol and drug use.

The tremendous growth in EAPs, however, began in the early 1970s. In 1972, the Occupational Programs Office of the Federal Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism offered federal grants to help increase the number of programs.

Did you know:

  • Studies show that when legal/financial work life services are provided, work loss was avoided in 39% of the cases and work productivity was improved 36% of the cases (Attridge, M. 2002, June). 

  • An employer-sponsored EAP program can reduce an employer’s disability costs, medical costs, pharmacy costs, and workers’ compensation costs (Watson Wyatt, 2001).

  • When EAP services are provided, work loss is avoided in 60% of cases with an average savings of 17 hours per case. 72% of these cases showed improved work productivity with an average gain of 43% (Attridge, M., 2001, August). 

What can an EAP offer to employees?

 EAPs offer employers an alternative approach to addressing job performance in the workplace. The goal of any EAP is to restore employees to full productivity. More specifically, EAPs provide confidential, short term counseling to identify the employee’s problem and, when appropriate, make a referral to an outside organization, facility or program that can assist the employee in resolving his or her problem.

Today’s companies rely on their employees to contribute to a successful bottom line. An EAP can enhance a company’s profitability by reducing liability, health insurance costs, and the expense of replacing employees. This is the true value that an EAP brings to today’s workplace.

 For more information call 770-683-1327 to find out if an EAP can assist your organization.